4 Really, Really Good Reasons To Stop Eating Factory Farmed Meat and Start Buying Organic Meat

Today’s post was sparked by a chat I had the other day with someone on Twitter.

I had just tweeted an infographic about all that yucky pink slime in America’s hamburgers. Normally, a tweet like this generates a pile of RTs from people who are viscerally grossed out by the existence of pink slime in their hamburgers.

pink-slime-jon-stewart-2

However…on this day, I ran into someone who didn’t care about the existence of pink slime in her McDouble because (in her words) McDonalds burgers taste AMAZING.

After I grabbed my jaw off of the floor, I replied to her and suggested that someone needed to introduce her to a better hamburger joint…because McD burgers ain’t as tasty as she thinks they are…with or without the pink slime.

The conversation went on for a few more tweets, with no real conclusion…she thinks that the Big Mac is the pinnacle of hot beef sandwich…and I prefer a burger made from grass fed beef and a lack of industrial chemicals.

But even though I couldn’t convince her to abandon her love affair with her McBurgers, this little chat got me thinking about the meat processing industry in general and the quality of meat that most of us eat every day.

After about 30 minutes of daydreaming, I came up with what I think are… 4 Really, Really Good Reasons To Stop Eating Factory Farmed Meat and Start Buying Organic Meat.

1.   Your Health

Medical science has come a long way in the last century.

  • Infant mortality rates have dropped.
  • Anti-biotics and anti-virals have saved millions of lives
  • Trauma surgeons put us back together after horrendous accidents

Unfortunately, medical science is having a hard time keeping up with the damage we inflict upon ourselves with our modern diet.

  • Diabetes rates are exploding
  • Obesity rates are exploding
  • Cancers related to diet are exploding
  • Dementia / Alzheimers rates are exploding

All of these conditions are directly related to the food we eat…and unlike the type of medicine we are really good at, these conditions are slow to develop and modern medicine can’t do a thing to cure them.

Here are a few articles if you want to learn more:

2.   Your Kid’s Health

Same reasons as above…but instead of just making ourselves, now we’re talking about your precious little bundles of joy.

3.   Your Tastebuds

Back in the olden days, your great-great-great-great grandparents ate organic…and free-range…and local…and all that other good stuff that costs me extra every time I go grocery shopping

But unlike me, they didn’t call their food organic or free-range…they called it food.

Because that’s what food was.

  • Cows grazed on grass until it was time for the rancher to turn them into dinner for his neighbours and…
  • Farmers used manure from their livestock to grow better vegetable crops and…
  • Chickens pecked around in the dirt eating bugs and seeds and grass and worms and…
  • Crops were rotated and seeds were shared and our produce wasn’t covered in chemicals or grown from genetically modified seeds and…
  • Hunters went into the woods and hunted for game

And not only was their food healthier…it tasted better.

Ever since I switched to free-range, naturally fed meats, I can’t believe how much better they taste, look and smell. The beef I buy comes from a co-op of ranchers in PEI who finish their grass-fed cattle by adding potatoes to their feed…they swear that it makes the beef taste sweeter.

I chuckled when the butcher first told me this…but that night as I was chomping down on a mushroom cheeseburger, I couldn’t stop making noises about how good the beef tasted….seriously, it was like I had never had a burger before…Ahhh-mazing.

FYI – Earlier today I made a meat sauce of grass-fed beef, mushrooms and tomato sauce. Very simple, very basic…but the taste…OMG. Right now, I am baking a spaghetti squash in the oven. In 10 more minutes, I am going to pour the sauce over of the spag and have a serious post-workout dinner. Mmmmmmmmmm good.

Better ingredients = Better tasting meals

4.  You’re not cool with torturing animals

As a self-aware human being and life-long meat eater, I understand and accept the moral implications of killing animals for my dinner.

  • Because I eat meat, I am partially responsible for the death of other animals.

I can live with this…I may not think about it all the time, but when confronted by a rabid vegan in a nutrition forum, I am able to own up to my complicity and still sleep well at night. Nature is bloody and meat consumption is partially responsible for the state of human evolution and our big brains.

What I can’t accept is the cruelty we inflict on the animals trapped in our industrial meat factories.

It is seriously messed up.

For example…in this video expose of Walmart’s pork suppliers, we see…

  • Pregnant pigs confined to gestation crates so small they are unable to even turn around or lie down comfortably
  • Workers slamming conscious piglets headfirst into the ground and leaving them to suffer and slowly die
  • Workers ripping out the testicles and slicing off the tails of piglets without the use of any painkillers
  • Sick and injured pigs with severe, bleeding wounds or infections left to suffer without veterinary care

All so we can save 50 cents on a pound of Walmart’s breakfast sausage.

Like I said…seriously messed up…and it doesn’t have to be this way.

If mega-corporations like Walmart told their suppliers to stop torturing their livestock, it would happen. It might cost you an extra 50 cents per pound of breakfast sausage…but it would happen.

Note – If you live in the U.S. and would like to see Walmart stop sourcing meat from producers who torture their livestock, you can sign this online petition…it takes about fifteen seconds.

Conclusion

I’m sure that there are a lot more reasons for you to stop eating factory farmed meat and start buying organic meat, but since I only thought about it for 30 minutes and I’m not that bright to begin with, I only came up with four really, really good reasons.

Hopefully they are good enough to get you to re-think tonight’s dinner purchase.

 

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The Walmartification Of The Organic Food Industry

There was a time in the ‘not so distant’ past, when organic food was just a teeny tiny sliver of the entire food consumption pie. Organic products were bought and sold primarily by hippies and health nuts. Not any more. In fact, since 1990, organic food sales in the United States and Canada have been growing at approximately 20% per year. In 2006, sales of organic food in the United States and Canada topped $18 billion. Numbers these large were enough to catch the attention of the mainstream agri-business industry. As a result, a growing percentage of the new growth in organic food sales is being driven by mainstream supermarketsIn 1998, organic food sales in supermarkets were half the size of the sales in natural food stores. However, by 2006, supermarket sales had grown to be neck and neck with the natural food stores.

click to expand the image

Even as food prices keep rising year after year, the demand for organics keeps rising faster than non-organics year after year, resulting in….

  • the expansion of existing organic food companies – both public and private,
  • the introduction of thousands of new raw & process organic food products,
  • takeovers (and mergers) of small organic independents by large food producers/retailers,
  • the introduction and expansion of private label organic brands by the large food producers/retailers,

Next pageAnimation of the Organic Food Industry and How it Has Changed – 1995-2007

Healthy Recipes Shouldn’t Taste This Good

Q.   What do you get when you combine two professional chefs with a celebrity nutritionist?
A.   You get three amazing recipes that taste way too good to be healthy.

Just in time for holiday entertaining.

Recipe #1 comes from Chef Rossy Earle.

For those of you who haven’t heard of Rossy, she lives in my hometown of Toronto…and aside from being one of Toronto’s hottest chefs, she is the creator of the world’s absolute best tasting hot sauce.

supicucu rossy earle diablo's fuego diabla's kiss

For this post, she offered up her….

Appetizer – Fresh Vegetable Spring Rolls

Ingredients

  • 1 pkg Rice paper wrappers
  • Hoisin Sauce
  • Coriander
  • Thai Basil or regular basil
  • Carrots
  • Red Pepper
  • Jicama
  • Celery
  • Daikon Radish
  • Enoki Mushrooms
  • Napa Cabbage or Red Cabbage
  • Baby spinach
  • Pea Sprouts

Directions

Julienne all vegetables into 2 – 2.5″ sticks in length. Keep in covered container ( this can be done ahead of time & set aside in the fridge even the day before)

Set up an assembly station on the counter with a medium size bowl of hot/warm water. To soften up rice wrappers, dip entire wrapper in warm water for 5 seconds, until pliable. Leave a few more seconds if not soft enough but not too long or the paper will tear.

  • About one inch from the bottom of softened wrapper, spread a little bit of Hoisin sauce.
  • Place a basil leaf, a sprig or coriander & any other leafy green you’ve chosen to use.
  • Then line up a few sticks of each vegetable on top of the greens to make colourful rows.
  • Fold bottom edge over filling then fold in both sides & make a tight roll pressing the top edge onto the roll to seal.
  • You can use a bit of the warm water to dip end of wrapper to make sure it sticks.

As you make each roll, place, seam down, in a container & cover.

Refrigerate until ready to use or at least 15 minutes to let the firm up & set. Then cut thru middle on a bias and serve with dipping sauce.

Note: Chef Rossy often modifies this recipe by adding shredded chicken, cooked pork, shrimp or whatever other ingredients she has in her fridge.

Dipping Sauce:

  • 1.5 Tbsp Agave
  • 1 tbsp Sambal Oelek
  • 1 tsp Fresh grated Ginger
  • 1 tsp Fresh grated Garlic
  • 1 scallion, finely chopped
  • 2 Tbsp fresh Lime Juice
  • 1 Tbsp Rice Vinegar
  • 1 Tbsp Light Soy sauce or Tamari
  • 1 tsp Sesame Oil
  • Mix all ingredients together & let sit at least 1 hour for flavours to blend.

For the main course, I contacted the Healthy Irishman…aka Chef Gavan Murphy. He offered up his…

Main Course – Braised Lamb Shank with White Beans

Chef Murphy tells me that this recipe serves 4 people…even 4 extra-muscled personal trainer type of people like me.

Ingredients

  • 3 lg. grass-fed lamb shanks (6 halves)
  • 3 large carrots – peeled,
  • 1/2″ slices 1 red onion – diced
  • 1 large leek, white only – sliced, rinsed
  • 4 garlic cloves
  • 1 tbsp tomato paste
  • bouquet garni (oregano, thyme, rosemary)
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 1 cup red wine (whatever you’re drinking will work)
  • 1 cup dried northern beans- soaked overnight or 2 x 15 oz canned white beans
  • 5 cups organic beef broth
  • 1/2 cup low-sodium organic chicken broth
  • 4 tbsp olive oil
  • S&P

Directions

  • Preheat oven to 325°F.
  • Preheat large skillet on high heat for 1 minute.
  • Add 2 tbsp olive oil.
  • Season each shank with S&P.
  • Sear in skillet for 2-3 minutes each side or until browned all over.
  • Remove to an oven-proof dish.
  • Wipe out excess oil from skillet with kitchen towel and drizzle with another 2 tbsp olive oil.
  • Add carrots, leeks, onion and garlic and saute for 5 minutes, stirring frequently so as not to burn.
  • When veggies are browned stir in tomato paste and stir to combine. Cook for 1 minute.
  • Add red wine, bouquet garni and bay leaves, stir and cook for 2 minutes.
  • Add this mixture to shanks along with soaked beans.

Pour in the chicken broth to the same pan you just used and deglaze by scraping all the caramelized bits from the pan. Add this to the lamb then pour in the beef broth over and mix everything together. Cover pan with foil and pop in oven. Cook for 2 1/2 hours or until lamb is fork tender and falls off the bone.

[box type=”note”]Gavan has provided HealthHabits with a ton of great recipes – Check ’em out [/box]

For dessert, I contacted uber-Nutritionist Julie Daniluk and she emailed me her recipe for…

Dessert – Genny’s Gluten Free Almond Ginger Cookies

Julie is the author of one of my favorite cookbooks –  Meals That Heal Inflammationand is also the co-host of the Oprah Winfrey Network’s Healthy Gourmet, a reality cooking show that highlights the ongoing battle between taste and nutrition. If that wasn’t enough, she is the recipient of the 2012 Canadian Health Food Association’s Organic Achievement Award.

And she’s a heck of a cook.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup (125 mL) Almond Butter*
  • 2 tsp (10 mL) Ground Ginger
  • 1 tbsp (15mls) Ground Cinnamon
  • 2 cups (500 mL) Almond Meal 1 tbsp (15 mL)
  • Ground Flax Meal 6 tbsp (90 mL)
  • Honey 1 tsp (5 mL)
  • Pure Vanilla Extract ¼ cup (65mls)
  • Organic 100% Unsweetened Chocolate Chips
Optional: Fruit Juice Sweetened Dried Cranberries (for decoration)
[box type=”note”]If you open the jar and the almond butter has separated, you’ll need to mix the oil back together with the almond butter and then measure[/box]
Directions
  • Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.
  • Place all the ingredients in a bowl and stir to thoroughly combine.
  • Roll the dough by hand into 1inch balls and lightly press down with a fork.
  • Decorate with cranberries if you choose.
  • Place the cookies on a parchment lined baking sheet.
  • Bake 10-12 minutes or until golden. The cookies will crisp as they cool.
  • Allow cookies to cool. They store well in an airtight container.
Yields 24 cookies.
Nutrition per cookie
  • Calories 96
  • Fat: 7 g
  • Carbs 8 g
  • Fiber 1.4 g
  • Protein 2.5 g

If you’re looking for more info/recipes/bottles of hot sauce, feel free to contact our three gourmets. They would be glad to hear from you.

Reference

Live Near Junk Food = Eat Junk Food : Live Near Health Food = Eat Junk Food

According to a study published in the Archives of Internal Medicine, living in a neighborhood loaded with junk food restaurants makes it more likely that you will eat a lot of junk food.

Surprised?

Probably not.

For years now, nutrition “experts” have been telling us that people who live in “food deserts” in which healthy food is difficult to find are doomed to a life of pizza, cheetos, soda, type 2 diabetes and morbid obesity.

As a result, the U.S. federal government has made it one of their priorities to increase access to healthy “real” food in these target neighborhoods. And by priorities, I mean spending big piles of tax dollars.

The idea  is that we spend some money in the short term to:

  1. Eliminate food deserts
  2. Improve the health of people living in food deserts, thereby
  3. Improving their productivity, quality of life, income, thereby
  4. Raising tax revenue, thereby
  5. Getting a positive return on the initial investment of tax dollars

Too bad this same AIM study couldn’t find a similarly strong relationship between the consumption of healthy food (fruit, vegetables, etc) and people who live in neighborhoods loaded with supermarkets.

After crunching the data, the researchers concluded that “there is some evidence for zoning restrictions on fast food restaurants within 3 km of low-income residents but suggest that increased access to food stores may require complementary or alternative strategies to promote dietary behavior change.”

Because it’s not enough to build supermarkets and stock them with healthy food.

People eat junk food because they believe that the short term benefits outweigh the long term costs.

And until that belief is changed, junk food producers will continue to make a ton of money and our population will continue to get fatter and more diabetic. 😦

What to do, what to do, what to do….

Here’s what I think

What about you?

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Reference

"Healthy" Food Makes You Hungrier

According to a pair of new studies, when “normal” people eat “healthy” food…. they get hungrier.

And what do they get hungry for?

More “healthy” food?

Nope.

They don’t want healthy… they want something tasty…something sweet, something greasy and crunchy and salty and…… damn, now I’m getting hungry.

But wait, this study doesn’t apply to me.

It only applies to “normal” people.

In the second study, people who identify themselves as being concerned about their health & bodyweight (like me) didn’t experience those same “post-health food” hunger pangs.

They were satisfied with the “healthy” food.

.

So, what’s the difference?

The difference is that people who identify themselves as “healthy” receive mental/emotional satisfaction from taking “healthy” actions – eating healthy foods, exercising, etc.

Conversely, “normal” people who don’t identify themselves as someone who eats for their health just don’t get that emotional/mental satisfaction.

And that lack of emotional/mental satisfaction manifests itself as a hunger for junk food.

And, to make things worse, when they eat the junk food, they actually strengthen that internal picture of themselves as someone who eats “junk” food instead of “healthy” food.

.

It’s a real chicken/egg dilemma.

.

Conclusion

There is no point in eating rice cakes and tofu if you hate eating tofu and rice cakes.

At some point, your dissatisfied brain will drive you towards that pint of Ben & Jerrys.

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You have to get your mind onside before you will be able to  any sort of lasting change.

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But that’s easier said than done, isn’t it.

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Sizzling Summer Steak Tacos

Beef Tacos with Smashed Avocado

So, 4th of July is here and it’s the biggest barbecue day of the year. I’m having my own barbecue for my friends and I’m really looking forward to it. I love the traditional barbecue foods of burgers, hot dogs, ribs & all that good stuff but I also like to do some different types of dishes as well. This is a great healthy recipe for grilled steak tacos. I love people to get involved in the cooking so I serve these up and let everyone help themselves. You’ll love how easy and tasty this is and your guests will be well impressed you went the extra mile to something a little different.

Continue reading here for the full recipe.

HAPPY 4TH TO YOU AND YOURS!

SUBSCRIBE to the NEW Healthy Irishman Newsletter!

Fueling your body with healthy food. Fueling your mind with the wealth of health.

Copyright © 2009 The Healthy Irishman. All rights reserved.

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Prosecco Poached Pears

Prosecco Poached Pears

So I decided to shake things up a bit here on Health Habits. In honor of Valentine’s Day I thought it might be good to do a post on a healthy dessert. Something simple yet elegant, again banking on the ‘Wow’ factor for your sweetheart. With the economy in the tanker right now, this is also a great idea that’s easy on your wallet. Of course you can substitute champagne if you wish but Prosecco,  a sparkling wine from north of Venice, Italy, offers the same great bubbly and quality without spending your gas money.

Now, would I really make something that’s horribly bad for you? No way. Pears are an excellent source of dietary fiber (a medium sized pear has 6 grams of fiber, 24% of the recommended daily allowance) and a good source of vitamin C, a proven antioxidant. Pears also offer potassium (a medium sized pear has 190 mg of potassium). They contain no saturated fat, sodium or cholesterol. A medium pear has about 100 calories. There’s no added sugar in this recipe, no butter, just a wee bit of the o’bubbly.

Serves 4

RECIPE:
4 Bosc pears, in season from mid-September through April or May.
2 cups Prosecco
2 cups Orange Juice
5 cloves
2 medium cinnamon sticks

Directions:
Peel and core the pears, leaving the stems intact. Trim the bottom of each so the pears will stand up in your pot.
Mix all the other ingredients together and pour over pears in your pot. Bring to a boil. Once boiling reduce heat to a simmer, partially cover and cook for 1 hour or until the pears are nice ‘n’ tender.
TIP: Make these a day ahead and let them cool in the poaching liquid. Once cooled to room temp, refrigerate. This way the flavor will soak into the pears and make them even sweeter.
To re-heat: Place the pears and poaching liquid in a saucepan and gently bring to a simmer. Heat for 15-20 minutes or until pears are warm.

Alternatively, if you decide to make them on the day of, no problem. Follow above directions and serve warm with some vanilla ice cream.
Garnish with some fresh lemon rind and drizzle of poaching liquid over.

If this doesn’t do the trick well, enjoy the priesthood!

Let me know how you get on with this recipe. And if you have any requests or questions, please leave a comment! To see more of my recipes and learn about me and my healthy food philosophies head over to thehealthyirishman.com.

The Healthy Irishman Fueling your body with healthy food. Fueling your mind with the wealth of health.

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Dieting or Healthy Eating?

In one corner, we have the current undefeated Champeen of the World….The multi-billion dollar Diet Industry.

In the other corner, we have this guy. Mr. Healthy Lifestyle

health-fitness-healthhabits-sylvester-stallone-rocky-photograph-c10101948

  • With billions and billions of book sales, video downloads and online subscription, the Diet Industry is like a cross between Mike Tyson, Muhammad Ali, Floyd Mayweather…with a big bucket of steroids and amphetamines thrown in for good measure.
  • The Healthy Lifestyle industry is like the little old lady who tells you to eat your vegetables.

As a result, the diet industry is the  1,000,000 to 1 odds-on favorite to win the battle for our “I want to get lean, healthy and fit” dollars.

  • But maybe, just maybe, we may be looking at a comeback for Healthy Eating.
  • There is more and more research being done that proves that a health focused lifestyle is the better way to a trim waistline.

The Science

A New Zealand based study looked at the negative effect that stress had upon the health of obese women. They found that obese women can improve their health and prevent further weight gain by ditching their diets and learning to deal with stress.

  • The study encouraged women to break free of chronic dieting and make lifestyle changes, including listening to their feelings of hunger and fullness rather than focusing on weight loss.
  • Following a group of 225 women, the research showed that the women who lost weight by dieting often regained the weight they lost, and more, within five years.
  • The researchers found that “the most successful intervention involved providing intensive training in relaxation techniques while equipping the women to recognize and avoid stress-related triggers for eating.’’
  • “Many overweight women had a fearful and guilt-ridden relationship with food, and their eating was often emotionally triggered”.

Additionally, the research showed that this lifestyle approach resulted in “significant improvement in reducing psychological symptoms, such as anxiety and depression, and medical symptoms including headaches, fatigue and lowered blood pressure”

Hmmmmmmmmm…it sounds like the diet industry might have something to worry about.

 

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walmart_organics-health-nutrition-healthhabits-food

Walmart: Your First Choice for Organic Food???

There was a time in the not so distant past, when organic food was a niche market. Organic products were bought and sold by the same ‘crunchy granola’ demographic.

Not any more.

In fact, since 1990, organic food sales in the United States and Canada have been growing at approximately 20% per year. In 2006, sales of organic food in the United States and Canada topped $18 billion.

These numbers have caught the attention of the mainstream agri-business industry.

As you can see in the chart below, the growth in organic food sales is being driven by mainstream supermarkets.

Over the past decade, the growth in organic food sales from natural food stores and the ‘direct to consumer’ route has been increasing at a moderate rate.

The same can’t be said for sales made at supermarkets. In 1998, organic food sales in supermarkets are half the size of the sales in natural food stores. However, in 2006, supermarket sales have grown to be neck and neck with the natural food stores.

There is money to be made. And big business is good at making big money.

The following charts illustrate how North America’s largest food processors have increased their share of the organic food market.

Organic Industry Structure: Top 30 Acquisitions – pdf

Organic Industry Structure: Top 30 Introductions – pdf

Organic Industry Structure: Significant Acquistions and Introductions – pdf

The following chart highlights the major independent organic food processors and their brands.

Organic Industry Structure: Major Independents and Their Brands – pdf

This chart illustrates the Private Label organic food brands available in North America

Organic Industry Structure: Private Label Brands – pdf

This chart presents a time line of the acquisitions and mergers of the 4 major organic food retailers.

Please note that on August 27, 2007, Whole Foods officially completed their buyout of Wild Oats.

Organic Industry Structure: Retail Acquisitions and Mergers – pdf

Organic Industry Structure: Whole Foods and Wild Oats Locations – pdf

This chart illustrates the concentration of the organic food market at the distribution level.

Organic Industry Structure: Distributor Acquisitions and Mergers – pdf

All of this data was originally organized by Dr. Philip Howard. I was introduced to it via this post from Lucas @ wwje. The purpose of this post is not to disparage any of the players involved in growing, distributing or selling of organic food.

My goal is to raise awareness in consumers to the fact that as the organic food industry grew, it changed.

The whale swallowed the minnow. Organic is now a marketing term. And the practices that endeared organic food to the early adopters may becoming endangered.

heart health healthhabits disease

Heart Disease and Stroke Caused By Diet

I’m sure this isn’t going to surprise many of you, but I was just reading a new study that claims that hypertension, heart disease and stroke is caused by diet.

By analyzing chemicals found in urine, researchers have been able to definitely link fluctuations in blood pressure to your metabolic fingerprint.

What the heck is metabolic fingerprint?

Metabolic fingerprint is a catchy way of describing the unique metabolites that are left behind by specific cellular processes. In this case, the scientists were looking at the metabolites (small molecules) found in urine, which reveal the way food is broken down in the body.

What does this mean to you?

According to the research, Western diets (rich in meat, high in alcohol and low in fibre) are bad.

Heart Disease and Stroke Caused By Diet

People who eat a diet high in animal protein (indicated by the metabolite alanine being present in urine) have…

  • higher blood pressure,
  • eat more calories,
  • have higher cholesterol,
  • and body mass indexes.

People who eat diets higher in starches such as rice (indicated by the metabolite formate) have…

  • lower blood pressure
  • and ingest fewer calories.

NOTE – People who have healthy levels of gut flora (reduced by antibiotic use, increased by prebiotics and probiotics and indicated by the presence of hippurate in the urine) also have lower blood pressure. Hippurate is also present in the urine of individuals with low levels of alcohol intake and higher levels of dietary fibre.

More Science…

  • While comparing the metabolic fingerprints of study participants in the U.K., United States, China and Japan, the scientists concluded that test subjects from the U.K. and the U.S.A. have similar genetic and metabolic profiles.
  • In contrast, while the Chinese and Japanese participants had similar genetic profiles, they had different metabolic fingerprints.

What was most interesting for me was the comparison of the native Japanese participants with those Japanese individuals living in the U.S.A.

  • Japanese-Americans displayed a typical American metabolic fingerprint;
  • Japanese-Japanese had the healthier non-Western metabolic fingerprint…indicating that lifestyle has a stronger effect on blood pressure & heart disease than genetics.

Conclusion…

  1. Heart disease is caused by diet
  2. Stroke is caused by diet
  3. You should stop eating processed junk food
  4. You should start eating the kind of food your great-great-grandparents ate

Reference