How to Get a Tan Without Risking Skin Cancer

  • You know that you look better with a bit of a tan.
  • But, you’re worried about getting skin cancer.

What would you say if I told you that there is some pretty solid science showing that a diet high in fruit and vegetables is more effecting at improving skin colour than suntanning?

The study, published in the journal Evolution and Human Behavior showed that (Caucasian) people who eat lots of fruit and vegetables have a more golden skin colour thanks to the high levels of carotenoids.

Most widely known for their presence in carrots, carotenoids are a type of antioxidant that helps reverse the oxidative damage we incur in our daily lives. In particular, carotenoids have a powerful effect on our immune and reproductive systems.

Lead author Dr Ian Stephen said: “We found that, given the choice between skin colour caused by suntan and skin colour caused by carotenoids, people preferred the carotenoid skin colour, so if you want a healthier and more attractive skin colour, you are better off eating a healthy diet with plenty of fruit and vegetables than lying in the sun.”

Dr Stephen suggests that the study is important because evolution would favour individuals who choose to form alliances or mate with healthier individuals over unhealthy individuals.

We should note that while this study looked exclusively at Caucasian faces, it may be true that a study of other racial groups would produce similar results.

Previous studies have shown similar preferences for skin yellowness to be found in an African population.

For more info on this study;

If you want to participate in future studies regarding health & beauty, check out The Perception Lab.

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Just Say No to Seitan

Four months ago I started working with a new PT client.

  • The client is a 42 year old woman
  • Who has been a vegan / vegetarian for the past 18 years
  • Whose goals were to drop some stubborn baby weight and improve her overall health & fitness.

The first month involved setting up her program, training & teaching 3x per week, 3 cardio & joint mobility sessions per week….and a never-ending argument about her diet.

  • Because…as a modern vegetarian, 60-80 % of her calories were coming from grains and soy.
  • And as the local Paleo guru, my clients are all “encouraged” to ditch the grains and soy and embrace the Paleo Diet.

Fast forward to today….

I finally convinced her to ditch the grains & beans and go Paleo for the past three months. During that time, she has seen massive improvements in:

  • Fat loss
  • Stomach bloat
  • Face bloat
  • Back fat
  • Sinus allergy symptoms
  • Rosacea
  • Joint pain
  • Headaches
  • Afternoon sleepiness
  • Blue moods – no clinical diagnosis, she just “feels better”
  • And some lady issues that she didn’t elaborate on  🙂

And she credits most of that improvement to her elimination of grains….especially wheat.

In the last month, she has played with re-introducing various “forbidden” foods. And the one that provoked the most noticeable “side effect” was wheat products – seitan, bread and wheat noodles. Almost instantly, she experienced stomach upset prompting a trip to the bathroom.

This prompted her to do a bunch of research on gluten intolerance. Part of that research involved contacting  my online friend Jaqui Karr. Jaqui is my go to source for gluten info.

Jaqui is as obsessed with gluten as a tween is with Justin Bieber.

[box type=”important”]If you want more info on gluten and the horrible stuff it’s doing to your body, check out Jaqui’s blog… or better yet, learn everything she knows about gluten via her Gluten Demystified program. Jaqui blends scientific research & common sense really, really well.[/box]

[box type=”note”]My client is such a big fan of Jaqui’s work that she has started promoting the Gluten Demystified program on her Facebook page and on a new Tumblog devoted to gluten intolerance[/box]

Reference

Make Insulin Your Friend… and Get Leaner, Stronger & Healthier

Over the next few months I am going to be conducting an experiment about the interaction between nutrition, exercise, blood sugar, insulin, body composition and overall health.

Here’s the plan…

Using a blood glucose monitor (supplied free of charge by Roche Diagnostics), I am going to have one of my clients measure his blood sugar, blood pressure and body composition again and again and again…. and we’re going to see how it reacts to different types of diets and training modalities.

Starting next week, he will begin taking his measurements upon waking, pre-meal, post-meal, pre-workout, post-workout and before bed.

I will track all the data and (fingers crossed), we should generate some pretty interesting data.

We will be testing how his body responds to:

  • a Standard American Diet (aka junk food)
  • a meat & potatoes diet
  • a vegetarian diet
  • a low fat diet
  • a high fat – Atkins style diet
  • a Paleo diet
  • a Mediterranean diet
  • Intermittent fasting
  • Cardio workouts
  • Health Habits workouts…. lots of HIRT
  • Heavy lifting – power bodybuilding style of workout
  • No workouts
If you have any suggestions, leave me a comment.
5 Ways to Get Fit Faster

The Top 10 Vitamin K Foods

The Standard American Diet results in:

  • Inflammation,
  • Obesity,
  • Insulin resistance,
  • and Diabetes

Luckily for you, Vitamin K reduces

  • Inflammation,
  • Insulin resistance and…
  • the likelihood that people who a Western diet will become fat and diabetic.

And how do we find this elusive Vitamin K?

Glad you asked….

  1. Kale – 1 cup, boiled & drained – 1062 mcg / µg
  2. Spinach – 1 cup, frozen, boiled & drained – 1027 mcg / µg
  3. Turnip Greens – 1 cup, frozen, boiled & drained – 851 mcg / µg
  4. Collards – 1 cup, boiled & drained – 836 mcg / µg  ***
  5. Brussels sprouts – 1 cup, frozen, boiled & drained – 300 mcg / µg
  6. Broccoli – 1 cup, boiled & drained – 220 mcg / µg
  7. Cabbage – 1 cup, boiled & drained – 163 mcg / µg
  8. Asparagus – 1 cup, boiled & drained – 144 mcg / µg
  9. Lettuce, iceberg – 1 head – 130 mcg / µg
  10. Peas, green – 1 cup,  canned & drained – 63 mcg / µg
Notes
  • I don’t know why the USDA thinks everyone is eating frozen greens instead of fresh, but they do. We’re going to assume that fresh Brussels sprouts have just as much Vitamin K as frozen… if not more
  • *** Beet greens, Dandelion greens and Mustard greens could / should have been included in this list – they would have placed between #4 Collards and # 5 Brussels sprouts.  I omitted them due to availability. If you have them in your area, go ahead and eat ’em up. They are Vit. K superstars.

Reference

This is Why You Need to Take Astragalus

Astragalus Membranaceus has been used for thousands of years in traditional Chinese medicine.

And even though us Westerners are a few thousand years late to the game, our scientists are working hard to get us up to speed.

In particular, an interesting study just came across my desk which showed how a decoction of the dried root of the Astragalus plant was very effective in:

  • reducing body weight
  • improving insulin sensitivity, and
  • improving the severity of fatty liver disease

Which is kind of a big deal considering that excessive body weight, type 2 diabetes and fatty liver disease is fast becoming the new normal in North America and Europe.

So, I decided to do a little more research into Astragalus and it’s effect on insulin sensitivity et al.

And I found a pile of research.

Research which showed how Astragalus was effective at:

  • boosting immune system function – cold, flu, infection, fever, allergies
  • reducing hypertension via a diuretic effect
  • eliminating free radicals
  • improving cardiac function
  • improving chronic fatigue
  • improving heart function
  • improving kidney function
  • improving symptoms of asthma
  • improving stomach ulcers
  • reducing inflammation
  • improving your body’s ability to handle stress

as well as…

  • reducing body weight
  • improving insulin sensitivity, and
  • improving the severity of fatty liver disease

All with no chance of toxicity.

Which is kind of important when you start messing around with herbs and roots.

So…where can you get this Astragalus stuff?

Consistency is Key to Fitness Success

 

I design fantastic training / nutrition programs.

Taking into account all of your physical/mental/emotional quirks, my programs are pretty much guaranteed to get you the body you want in the shortest amount of time and with the least amount of work.

There’s only one problem.

If you skip workouts and cheat on the meal plan…it ain’t gonna work.

And that’s why consistency is key to fitness success.

  • If you HATE vegetables, you’re not going to stick to a vegetarian/Paleo/Mediterranean diet
  • If the nearest health club is 30 minutes away from home or work, you’re going to skip workouts
  • If your wife wants you to join her Zumba class but you hate to dance, what do you think is going to happen?

You’re going to quit. And since quitting is pretty much the opposite of consistency, your fitness goals will go straight down the drain.

zumba

The Moral of this Story

But, do it consistently – day in and day out.

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Roasted Pumpkin & Pear Soup

Today’s recipe is courtesy of my better half also known as, the missus. Enjoy – Gavan.

There comes a time when the wife of a chef has to dig in and do the dirty work. Lucky for me I like to cook but I’m still getting used to just whipping things together as I’m more of a recipe girl. But sometimes (just sometimes in my case) throwing caution to the wind pays off.

Our fruit bowl was overflowing with apples, pears, persimmons, pumpkin and winter squash. I stared at it thinking, what to make….what to make….

I love pumpkin soup. I love pears. Why not?

With a little guidance from the hubby I whipped up a delicious twist on the usual pumpkin soup and it was fabulous.

Here’s the full recipe. Take a gander ’round my site and you’ll find lots more healthy tidbits.

For those of you who’ve followed my recipes here on HH, I just launched my new online cooking show with Robin Quivers from the Howard Stern show. It’s called Vegucating Robin.

In it I’m teaching Robin, a vegan, how to cook all varieties of vegetables. This is a show for any and everyone who enjoys cooking but needs a little inspiration in the kitchen.
If you get a sec take a look.

Here’s some more of my Paleo friendly recipes from previous posts.

Make sure you sign up for my newsletter to get my FREE Entertainment booklet with recipes and tips for your next or first dinner party.

Have a great weekend guys.

Cheers.

U.S. Government Subsidizes Healthy Food

Every year, the U.S. federal government subsidizes America’s junk food habit with bazillions of dollars in tax breaks & subsidies.

But today, in a shocking turn of events, the USDA has announced the creation of a new “healthy eating” program.

Or, in other words… The U.S. government is subsidizing healthy food.

The $20 million program is being tested in Hampden County, Mass. and is designed to encourage healthy eating among low income families.

Specifically, The Healthy Incentives Pilot will enroll 7,500 randomly selected SNAP (aka Food Stamps) households to receive the HIP incentives.

For every dollar that participants spend on fruits and vegetables using their SNAP Electronic Benefit Transfer cards, 30 cents will be added to their benefit balance – thus cutting the cost of fruits and vegetables by almost one-third.

And if this Dutch research is correct, this cost cutting measure will result in the higher consumption of fruits & vegetables.

And to make things even better, this program will operate in tandem with the Food Bank Farm program already being sponsored by the Food bank of Western Mass. (The FB Farm program promotes local food consumption)

Conclusion

This program seems pretty great to me.

  • It reduces the cost of fruits & vegetables
  • It increases the consumption of fruits & vegetables
  • It increases the consumption of local fruits & vegetables

The only drawback seems to be the $20 million.

Maybe the USDA should raise the cash by slashing some of the current USDA junk food subsidies.

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Breakfast Egg Crepes

If there was ever a breakfast of champions, this is it. Simple, healthy and most importantly delicious. This is my take on the traditional crepe or pancake. Super high in protein and loaded with fresh flavour.

The photo says it all.

RECIPE:
Serves 2

2 organic egg whites
2 organic whole eggs
pinch salt n pepper
Olive oil spray

Here’s the full recipe. Take a gander ’round my site and you’ll find lots more healthy tid bits.

Also make sure you sign up for my newsletter to get my FREE Entertainment booklet with recipes and tips for your next, or first dinner party.

You’ll also find a bunch more Paleo friendly recipes to keep you busy.

Happy 4th!

4th of july fireworks Pictures, Images and Photos

Well guys, we are nearing the biggest barbecue holiday weekend here Stateside and I’ve found myself in the thick of it. This year I’m catering 2 gigs instead of throwing the big ol’ hooha (as my missus calls it) like last year so I decided to do a round up of my best 4th of July/barbecue recipes for those of you lucky enough to be in the sunshine. I even put a Paleo section together for you guys, after all it is barbecue.
Cheers to a happy, healthy and safe holiday!

MEAT & POULTRY

To see the full recipe head over to GavanMurphy.com where you’ll also find a bunch more healthy recipes.

Make sure you sign up for my newsletter to get my FREE Entertainment booklet.

You may find even more Paleo friendly recipes.

Sesame Crusted Turkey & Spinach Salad

I made this recipe with a two friends in mind. One’s a Paleo-head (guess who?) and the other a young father with another on the way who’s trying his hand at this healthy cooking stuff. There’s not a whole lot the latter guy eats that doesn’t resemble meat and potatoes but lucky for me he just so happens the likes raw spinach. I’m a big fan of salads for dinner in the summer as long as they’re satisfying, you know what I mean. If the salad is wimpy we’re going to bed hungry and that’s definitely not a good thing. Of course I put this one to the test myself and it passed with flying colours. The sesame seeds not only added a lovely nutty flavour but also added nutrients and minerals that left me quite satisfied indeed.

RECIPE:
Serves 2

1 lb organic turkey loin
1.5 oz jar toasted sesame seeds
1 tsp ground cumin
1 tsp lemon pepper
1 organic egg white – slightly beaten
pinch salt (omit if you’re a die hard Paleo)
1 tbsp olive oil

To see the full recipe head over to GavanMurphy.com where you’ll also find a bunch more healthy recipes.

Make sure you sign up for my newsletter to get my FREE Entertainment booklet.

You may find even more Paleo friendly recipes.

Happy Father’s Day to all the pops.

Homemade LaraBar Recipes

I love LÄRABARS

  • I love them in an obsessive sort of way.
  • I love them in a way that is bordering on unseemly.
  • I love them because they are made with a minimal number of real ingredients with no sweeteners, no fillers, no supplements, no flavorings or no preservatives

LÄRABARS are 100% real food.

But, more than all of that, I love how LÄRABARS taste. Problem is, LÄRABARS ain’t cheap.

For example, one of my clients uses LÄRABARS to fuel her Health Habits workouts. And at $2.50 per bar x 2 bars per workout x 5 workouts per week, that means she spends $25 per week on LÄRABARS. If we assume that she takes two weeks off from her workout schedule per year, that means she spends $25 x 50 weeks = $1250 per year on LÄRABARS.

Which she would be okay with. Unfortunately, her husband isn’t.

So, to maintain connubial bliss, my client and I went online in search of homemade LÄRABAR recipes.

Here’s what we found:

And for those visual learners out there, here is a “how to make” Larabars video for your viewing pleasure.

Well, that should be enough to get you started. But if none of those flavor combinations suit your fancy, here is a list of the “official” Larabar flavors.

Bon appetit.

Paleo 'Fried' Chicken 'n' Strawberry Salad

Fried Chicken n Strawberry Salad

Who doesn’t like fried chicken? How about a gluten free healthy version that tastes amazing without all the unnecessary fat and calories. This is my version that, if I do say so myself, hits the spot.

Can you believe we’re in June already? Summer is on our doorstep and Father’s Day is around the corner so I decided to revisit my version of fried chicken, a sure-fire hit for both occasions!

BTW did I add that this is baked not fried chicken. How ’bout that?

I’ve made this chicken before (click here for recipe) but this time I paired it with a seasonal strawberry salad since strawberries are gorgeous right now. It’s a super easy salad including the dressing. Simple and delicious, just my style.

NOTE:

To update this recipe to a fully Paleo version, you can substitute nut meal/flour for the GF bread crumbs. FYI, you can buy nut meal from Bob’s Red Mill or, if you’re adventurous, you can make your own.

Also, if your version of Paleo eating doesn’t include vinegar, you can substitute lemon juice. It won’t be near as tasty, and you will have to adjust quantities, but feel free.

STRAWBERRY SALAD RECIPE:
Serves 4

4 cups organic mixed greens
1 cup walnuts – toasted in hot dry saute pan ’til golden
1 cup organic strawberries – sliced

I highly recommend choosing organic strawberries because you don’t want to eat a lovely salad laced in pesticides, right?

Aged Balsamic Vinaigrette:
1/4 cup aged balsamic vinegar
2 tbsp wholegrain mustard
1 tsp organic honey
pinch S&P
3/4 cup olive oil

DIRECTIONS:
In a large bowl combine the lettuce, nuts and strawberries. Toss gently.

I have the easiest quickest way to make this vinaigrette: Put everything in a plastic or glass jar and give it a good ol’ shake. Taste and season.

Drizzle enough dressing to lightly coat the greens but don’t drown them. You should have some leftover dressing for next time.

All recipes are made with the finest quality farmers’ market whole foods, natural and non-processed ingredients as much as possible.

Head over to my site, GavanMurphy.com, to see more healthy recipes and make sure you sign up for my newsletter to get my FREE Entertainment booklet.

You may find even more Paleo friendly recipes.

Cheers.

How 'bout an Ostrich Burger?

….And now for something completely different. I was in the market the other day and happened to be looking through the freezer section for some buffalo meat, a lingering craving after my recent trip to Texas. I usually peruse this aisle just to see what they have on offer like frozen mash potatoes. I’ve never understood why people would buy frozen mash like this. By the time you have defrosted the mash you could go peel and boil a fresh batch them, am I right? Anyway, my buffalo search was unsuccessful although I did come across a package of ostrich patties. Now this was interesting and the more I read on the package the more I wanted to try it.

Here’s a few fun facts courtesy of Blackwing Meats, the brand I purchased. (I’m going to pass these off like I knew them already, k?)

Ostrich is a wonderful healthy red meat with the flavor and texture of beef. It’s rich in both protein and iron and is actually lower in fat, calories and cholesterol than skinless chicken or turkey. Our Ostrich meats are rich in Omega 3 and Omega 6 fatty acids which are widely recognized as being beneficial to health. Enhanced Omega 3 and Omega 6 levels are achieved by feeding our ostrich a specially formulated diet.

  • They come from Africa
  • South Africa has been raising them for over 200 years
  • Ostrich’s can provide leather, meat and feathers
  • Ostrich leather is the second most valuable in the world and is well known for its toughness and strength
  • The meat tastes like beef but is higher in omega 3 fatty acids, is lower in saturated fat and calories
  • Ostrich is the largest bird in the world
  • It is unable to fly as it lacks a breast bone and doesn’t sing
  • It can run at staggering speeds of up to 45 mph and has a powerful and deadly kick
  • they are omivores and eat whatever is available from plants to insects and small lizards
  • Adults can grow up to 9 feet tall and weight 350-400lb!
  • they can live up to 50-75 years

The meat Market in the US for Ostrich is expanding to meet the demand for healthier red meats, if you have yet to try it, consider ordering some from us you will be glad you did.

Yes indeedy, glad I tried it. It’s lean and has the same texture as beef but a bit gamier. I quite liked it! For a guy who doesn’t eat much red meat this could be a great option for me this summer. Who’s game?

Ostrich Burger Recipe
Serves 2

2 x 4-6 oz Ostrich patties
drizzle olive oil
avocado slices
green leaf lettuce

Paleo Ostrich Burger

Continue reading here for the full recipe.

For those of you who are regular readers here I am the man formally known as The Healthy Irishman (although I am still both healthy and Irish).
My new site, GavanMurphy.com, is up ‘n’ running so please sign up for my newsletter and get my FREE Entertainment booklet.
Head over and take a look around. You may find even more Paleo friendly recipes.

Cheers.

Herbed Apple Stuffed Pork

Herbed Apple Pork

What’s up Paleo people? Here’s another beauty for you. I’m not sure about you guys but I’m a big fan of pork loin. It’s lean and Paleo protein packed (assonance or alliteration??). The stuffing in this recipe will not only add some great flavour but help keep the meat moist which is sometimes a problem with these less fatty cuts of meat.
This is spot on for Sunday lunch for the family and as you’ll see pretty straight forward.

Enjoy!

RECIPE:
Serves 4

1 1/2 lb organic/grass fed pork loin
1 red apple – small dice (If chopping ahead, keep in water with a squeeze of lemon juice)
1 celery stalk – small dice
1 garlic cloves – minced
1 lemon – zested
1/4 cup parsley – chopped
1/4 cup sage – chopped
1/2 cup Calvados (apple brandy)
4 tbsp olive oil
S&P

To see the rest of the recipe head over here.

You may be surprised to know that I wasn’t actually christened The Healthy Irishman, totally true. I grew into that name. I now go by the name my creators gave me.
My new site, GavanMurphy.com, is up ‘n’ running so please sign up for my newsletter and get my FREE Entertainment booklet. Head over and take a look around. You may find even more Paleo friendly recipes.

Cheers.

Chipotle Grilled Flank Steak

Although Cinco de Mayo is done, bbq season is on the way so today’s recipe is Paleo perfect for an afternoon when the grill is out and some of your carniverous peeps are popping by. It’s always great to have a few quick marinade recipes in your pocket and here’s a beauty.

RECIPE:
Serves 4

1 1/2 lbs grass fed flank steak

Marinade:
2 canned chipotle peppers (not 2 cans just 2 peppers!) – chopped
1 tbsp Adobo sauce (from chipotle can)
1 small lemon – zested
1 tsp lemon juice
1/4 cup olive oil
2 tbsp dried oregano

To see the rest of the recipe head over here.

You may be surprised to know that I wasn’t actually christened The Healthy Irishman, totally true. I grew into that name. I now go by the name my creators gave me.
I just launched my new site GavanMurphy.com. Head over and take a look around. You may find even more Paleo friendly recipes.

Cheers.

Your Great-Great-Great-Great Grandparents Ate Organic: Why Don't You?

For over 200,000 years, modern humans (homo sapiens sapiens) have been feeding themselves with nature’s bounty.

Around 10,000 years ago, we got sick of gathering our veggies and invented agriculture (aka farming).

And ever since then, farmers have been obsessed with finding ways to improve their crop production.

Using different crop production techniques:

  • Tillage
  • Pest control
  • Crop rotation
  • Composting
  • Nutrient management – manure, fertilizers
  • Water management – irrigation

Modern farmers are able to produce food in quantities that our great, great, great great grand-farmers would find unbelievable.

And it isn’t just the farmers.

In the approximately 10,000 years that we have been raising domesticated animals for food, we have also made significant advances in our production methods. In countries that have adopted these modern food production practices, a shortage of food is no longer a problem.

In fact, it is our relative surplus of food (calories) that has given rise to a whole host of new and improved metabolic problems.

So, where did we go wrong?

In my humble opinion, it is our focus on the quantity rather than the quality of food that is the cause of our current problems.

  • Our focus on calories instead of nutrients.
  • Our never ending desire for giant steroid & GMO corn-fed steaks.
  • Our demand for oversized and perfect looking produce.

Back in the day, your great-great-great-great grandparents ate nothing but organic food.

  • They ate foods that were in season in their area of the country.
  • They ate grass-fed steaks and chickens that weren’t fed other chickens in their GMO chicken feed.
  • They drank more water and less juice, pop and frappucinos.

And they looked good doing it.

Actually, they looked a little serious, but they still looked better than their 21st century cousins. Perhaps it’s time that organic (aka real) food became the norm and food loaded with chemicals became the aberration.

Paleo Pork Chops

Alright Paleo peeps, here we go.

Pork is one of those meats that’s a little underrated. There’s so much flavour in all the various cuts especially the fattier varieties but of course I like to use the more leaner cuts like the chop or loin.

One of the main issues using these cuts is the chance of over cooking or drying them out. My technique of adding some broth when cooking the chops always gets you a juicy succulent result. This is no exception and it’s such an easy recipe to boot. The added crust here just creates a brilliant burst of flavour.

RECIPE:
Serves 2

2 x 6 oz organic/grass fed pork chops
1/2 cup low sodium organic chicken broth

Marinade:
2 tbsp fresh rosemary – chopped
1 tbsp wholegrain mustard
1 lemon – zested
2 cloves garlic – minced
1/4 tsp salt
1/4 tsp pepper
1/4 cup olive oil

Continue reading for the full recipe. I would if I were you, well worth it!

Don’t forget to SUBSCRIBE to the HEALTHY IRISHMAN Newsletter!

When you do you’ll receive a FREE Entertainment Booklet with recipes and tips for your next dinner party.

Fueling your body with healthy food. Fueling your mind with the wealth of health.

Copyright © 2010 The Healthy Irishman. All rights reserved

Brisket a la Chard

Brisket with Swiss Chard
Hey guys, so today’s Paleo recipe is for all the carnivores. Oh ya wait..that’s most if not all of you. This’ll definitely hit the spot and is another one pot deal so after you’ve demolished the beef you’ll only have the one dish to ask your missus to clean. You’re welcome! This also falls into the cheap n cheerful category so no excuses.

Enjoy!

RECIPE:

Serves 6

3 lbs grass fed beef brisket
1/4 cup Dijon mustard
8 oz pearl onions – peeled (see tip below)
2 cups red wine (If you’re a strict Paleo and don’t fancy a bit of vino in your grub, omit it and add 2 extra cups of broth. The flavour won’t be as intense though.)
2 quarts (8 cups) organic beef broth
1 cup fresh oregano
4 cloves garlic
2 tbsp olive or grape seed oil. (Grape seed oil get to a higher temperature before burning so is ideal for high heat searing.) (other Paleo options include coconut oil, tallow & lard)

DIRECTIONS:
Preheat oven to 300°F.

Preheat large skillet on high for 1 minute. Season the brisket with S&P on both sides. Drizzle olive or grape seed oil in pan and sear meat for 3-4 minutes each side until golden. Remove to a deep oven proof dish. Rub the Dijon mustard into brisket once seared. Once brisket has been removed from skillet reduce heat to medium and wipe out same pan with a kitchen towel. Add wine, onions, herbs and garlic to pan and cook for 3 minutes. Add to meat along with beef broth. Cover with foil and pop in the oven for 2 1/2 – 3 hrs or until the meat is tender enough to slice.

To reheat (if not serving immediately) – slice brisket into 1/2″ slices and place back into sauce. Reheat in 350°F oven for 20 minutes, covered.

TIP: To peel pearl onions, boil them for 1 minute first, drain and peel. The skins will come right off. Way easier.
Watch your fingers though, muy caliente!

Serving suggestion: Saute Swiss Chard.

To find out how to cook the chard head on over to my site.

Don’t forget to SUBSCRIBE to the HEALTHY IRISHMAN Newsletter!

When you do you’ll receive a FREE Entertainment Booklet with recipes and tips for your next dinner party.

Fueling your body with healthy food. Fueling your mind with the wealth of health.

Copyright © 2010 The Healthy Irishman. All rights reserved

Grilled Cod with Carrot Parsnip Puree

Grilled Cod with Carrot Parsnip Puree

Here’s a lovely simple recipe for the weekend. Today’s Good Friday and growing up we’d always have fish on Fridays but especially today. I figured I’d better keep the mother happy and post a fish recipe for you guys just so she knows I haven’t lost all my values. Just kidding Mary! What I love about Pacific cod aside from it being fished sustainably is how moist it is. It’s perfect for grilling as it has a high oil content which helps keep it moist and delicious.

Happy Easter guys.

Serves 2

RECIPE:
2 x 6oz Pacific cod fillets
S&P
1/2 lemon – zested
drizzle olive oil

2 carrots – peeled, chopped
2 parsnips – peeled, chopped
1/4 cup homemade organic chicken stock or homemade veg stock
drizzle olive oil
S&P

DIRECTIONS:
Began by cooking the carrot and parsnip in salted water ’til fork tender. Drain and mash. Add splash of organic chicken or veg stock along with drizzle olive oil.Taste and season with S&P. I add the stock and olive oil in place of butter, you’ll be surprised how well it works. Leave in same pot to warm on low heat.

Preheat non-stick grill pan on medium high heat for 1 minute. Season cod fillet with S&P and lemon zest. Drizzle olive oil in pan and gently lay fish down away from you to prevent the oil splashing.
Let sear on one side for 2-3 minutes until golden. Flip over and reduce heat to medium. Cover pan with lid or foil to finish cooking, 2 minutes approx. This also helps retain the heat and steam the fish ’til cooked thus making the fish moist.

Serve with farmers market grilled asparagus with squeeze fresh lemon.

All recipes are made with the finest quality farmers market whole foods, natural and non-processed ingredients.


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Fueling your body with healthy food. Fueling your mind with the wealth of health.

Copyright © 2010 The Healthy Irishman. All rights reserved

Grilled Salmon with Curried Cauliflower Puree

Wild Salmon with Curried Cauliflower PureeI always try to cook seasonal foods as much as possible which is why I shop at farmers markets. I know everything I get there will be in season and local. I actually got this cauliflower in my CSA box so I knew it would be perfect with some simple grilled salmon so as you can see that’s what you’ve got. This is definitely Paleo friendly and is loaded with the good Omega 3 fatty acids.
Simple, healthy and delicious. Brilliant.

Serves 2

Recipe:
2 x 4-5 oz wild Pacific salmon
1 head organic cauliflower – roughly chopped in florets
2 tsp curry powder
1 tbsp agave/honey
2 tbsp olive oil
1/4 tsp salt
1/2 tsp pepper

Continue reading the Full Recipe Here and don’t forget to SUBSCRIBE to the HEALTHY IRISHMAN Newsletter!

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Fueling your body with healthy food. Fueling your mind with the wealth of health.

Copyright © 2010 The Healthy Irishman. All rights reserved

BBQ Lamb Chops w/ Root Veg Boulangère

Grilled Lamb Chops
After all the good Irish food & drink from Paddy’s Day I figured some of you guys might need a little cleansing food for the weekend. This is a great seasonal dish highlighting some beautiful lamb and  veggies that some people may not use or even know of. I grew up eating turnips all the time. They have a delicious sweet nutty flavour. They’re in season right now but with spring just here you should take advantage of these great veggies while they last. Those of you who know my cooking style will know I’m all about simple delicious food and this definitely fits the bill. I didn’t want to mask the great natural flavour of the grass-fed lamb so I just enhanced it with some flavourful fresh garden herbs.

LAMB RECIPE:
Serves 4

2 racks of grass-fed lamb (16 chops)
1/4 tsp salt – use to season before grilling
1/4 tsp pepper – use to season before grilling

Marinade:
1/4 cup fresh thyme
1/4 cup fresh parsley
2 garlic cloves – minced
1 lemon – zested
3 tbsp olive oil

Grilled Lamb Chops
Mix all marinade ingredients together and toss lamb chops in marinade for at least 2 hours up to 6 hours, refrigerated.

Remove chops from fridge 1 hour before grilling to let return to room temp.

Preheat grill (outdoor or stove top) on medium for 5 minutes.
Season chops with S&P. Sear for 3-4 minutes on each side for medium rare. Remove from grill and let rest for 3 minutes before serving.

Paleo Root Veg Gratin

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Fueling your body with healthy food. Fueling your mind with the wealth of health.

Copyright © 2010 The Healthy Irishman. All rights reserved

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Paddy's Paleo Beef Stew

Yet another beef stew!

Next week is St. Paddy’s Day so all week on my site I’ve been featuring a bunch of healthy Irish recipes. Continuing on with my Irish recipe round up…..Yep, it’s another Irish beef stew. I can’t help it–it’s in my DNA!
You’re probably familiar with my Beef & Guinness version and you may remember I made an Autumn Stew this past year. What’s the difference besides the obvious use of Guinness? Subtle differences like using more types of root veg, pearl onions and no potatoes in the stew itself (making it a perfect St. Paddy’s Paleo dish) are the main differences, which goes to show that you can take the same idea and make it different and seasonal.

Beef Stew Mise en Place

Continue reading the Full Recipe Here and don’t forget to SUBSCRIBE to the HEALTHY IRISHMAN Newsletter!

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Fueling your body with healthy food. Fueling your mind with the wealth of health.

Copyright © 2010 The Healthy Irishman. All rights reserved

Grilled Steak n Cauliflower

Peppered Steak with Roasted Cauliflower

There’s a lot to be said for mastering basic cooking techniques like properly grilling a steak, plain and simple. Here I’ve done just that yet to spice things up I roasted cauliflower with a little kick using smoked paprika. This might sound too basic but this is where choosing your ingredients makes all the difference. Grass-fed meats and organic produce are bursting with natural flavour. Delicious doesn’t have to mean complicated.

RECIPE:
2 x 6oz NY grass-fed steaks
1 tsp cracked black pepper (1/2 tsp per steak)
1/4 tsp salt
1 tbsp grape seed oil (or olive oil if preferred). Grape seed oil gets to a higher temp before burning so is ideal for searing on high heat.

1 head organic cauliflower – cut in florets
1/4 tsp smoked paprika
1/4 cup green olives – halved
1/4 tsp pepper
2 tbsp olive oil
drizzle agave or honey

Continue reading the Full Recipe Here and don’t forget to SUBSCRIBE to the HEALTHY IRISHMAN Newsletter!

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Fueling your body with healthy food. Fueling your mind with the wealth of health.

Copyright © 2010 The Healthy Irishman. All rights reserved

Seafood Stew

Mardi Gras Seafood Soup

Growing up in Ireland most people assume it’s all meat n veg but being an island we have amazing seafood and a lot of my training as a chef was in seafood restaurants. This is my simplified version of a bouillabaisse. Typically, and according to tradition, there should be at least five different kinds of fish (not including shellfish) in a proper bouillabaisse. That can get pretty pricey so I thought I’d use some key seafood ingredients saving money yet without compromising flavour (which I may have used for a (my) six-pack). This version is light, fresh and brothy… just the way I roll!

If you do have a craving for some good ol’ fashioned meat try my Tomato marinated Flank Steak or Citrus Fennel Crusted Pork.

RECIPE:
Serves 4

20 mussels – rinsed
20 Manila clams – rinsed
1/2 lb large locally caught wild shrimp – P&D’d (peeled & de-veined)
1 lb white fish (Pacific cod, Tilapia, Pacific halibut) – 1″ cubes
3 cups leeks (whites only) thinly sliced, washed
1 red bell pepper – small dice
3 bay leaves
1/2 tsp chili flakes
1 x 15 oz can diced tomatoes – drained
1 cup white wine (whatever’s in your glass will work) OR an 8 fluid oz bottle of clam juice*
3 cups water
about a handful of fresh basilchiffonade
2 sprigs fresh thyme (for steaming mussels & clams)
2 tbsp olive oil

*TIP: Bottled clam juice is easily found in the States though it might be hard enough to find across the pond. Steaming the shellfish in the white wine is a great alternative for making your own clam juice.

DIRECTIONS:

Preheat large soup pot on medium heat for 1 minute. Add olive oil along with leeks, red pepper and chili flakes. Saute, stirring occasionally for 5 minutes. Cover with lid while they’re sauteing. This will keep in the moisture and help prevent them from going brown. You don’t want any colour on the leeks, just softened.
As leeks and pepper are cooking, preheat a large saute pan on high heat for 1 minute. Very carefully add mussels and clams to pan along with the wine and thyme or bottled clam juice and thyme. (Be careful of splashing the liquid.) Cover with lid and cook until all the shells are open. Give the pan a shake after 30 seconds or so to move them around. Cook for 2 minutes approx or until all the shells have opened.
NOTE: If there are any unopened or cracked shells when the majority are cooked, discard them.

Holding a colander over the soup pot drain the shellfish into the colander. This steaming liquid will be the base of your soup and it’s delicious. Add the water, bay leaves and chopped tomatoes to the soup pot and bring to a boil.
Next remove all the mussels & clams from their shells. Set the meat aside and throw away the shells or even better you could use them with your saved veg and the shrimp shells to make a seafood stock.

Making Seafood Soup

Add the white fish and shrimp to the soup and stir. (They’ll cook in the broth.) Once soup comes to a boil reduce heat to a simmer. Cook for 15 minutes on medium low heat.
Just before serving add all mussels, clams and fresh basil. Stir and taste. Season with S&P.

Mardi Gras Seafood Soup

All recipes are made with the finest quality farmers market whole foods, natural and non-processed ingredients as much as possible.

Continue reading the full recipe here and don’t forget to SUBSCRIBE to the HEALTHY IRISHMAN Newsletter!

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Fueling your body with healthy food. Fueling your mind with the wealth of health.

Copyright © 2010 The Healthy Irishman. All rights reserved

Poblano Pork Stew

Poblano Pork Stew

Being in California I’m exposed to an amazing array of fresh organic fruit n veg that I wouldn’t normally get, especially back at home so I’m taking full advantage of it. One of my weekly adventures is heading to our local farmers market and seeing what’s in season and figuring out something to make with it. You might recall a few weeks back I made a Braised Beef Rib recipe using some Poblano peppers, which actually came from my garden. Turns out I really liked their charred smoky flavour so I figured I’d have another go with them. I love roasted peppers (Roast Red pepper Hummus) and funny enough I actually made this pork dish already but my photos weren’t up to par so this is round two. With a few tweaks this turned out even better than the last time.
Lucky for you I’m a shitty photographer!

Poblano Peppers in my Garden

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Copyright © 2010 The Healthy Irishman. All rights reserved

Shrimp & Spaghetti (Squash) Fra Diavolo

Shrimp & Spaghetti Squash Fra Diavolo

You may have noticed all the different winter squash at the markets–acorn, butternut, spaghetti, kabocha, just to name a few. I absolutely love butternut squash, which is what I tend to use most often. I suppose we all tend to stick with what we know and like but lately I’ve had quite a few inquiries for what to do with a spaghetti squash, which is great because I really dig this squash too. Actually I’m really into pasta (gluten free) but I’m off heavy carbs in the evening thanks to DR, Mr. Health Habits himself with the training program I’m on so this squash, believe it or not, makes a brilliant substitute for pasta! Thought all you who are sticking to any sort of get-in-shape regiment and of course all the Paleos, would love this idea, too.

RECIPE:
Serves 2 with leftovers

1 medium spaghetti squash (preferably organic)
1 lb medium wild, locally caught shrimp (21-30’s) P&D’s (peeled & de-veined)
1 cup pasta tomato sauce (whatever you fancy)
1 tbsp capers
1/2 lemon- zested
chili flakes (as much as you can handle)

Continue reading the full recipe here and don’t forget to SUBSCRIBE to the HEALTHY IRISHMAN Newsletter!

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Fueling your body with healthy food. Fueling your mind with the wealth of health.

Copyright © 2010 The Healthy Irishman. All rights reserved

Herb Grilled Chicken with Celery Root Puree

Grilled Chicken with Celeriac Puree

I wonder, is the Super Bowl as popular in Canada as it is here? All week I’ve posted healthy Super Bowl grub on my site but then I started thinking….if we happen to fall off the wagon a bit and chug a few unexpected beers, shouldn’t I have a ‘make-up’ recipe ready to rock for Monday? Being healthy is all about balance and planning ahead, right?

I’m still new to the Paleo way of eating but I think I’ve a good idea here. What I really try to do with food, besides creating easy healthy recipes, is to shop and eat sustainably and seasonally. With all my recipes you are encouraged to use what ever is in season in your area, which might be different than my area especially because I’m planted in sunny Southern California, as I often like to remind DR. (Better not make him too jealous or my next workout session might be brutal!)

Since the Paleo diet does not include potatoes (ouch says the Irishman) I wanted to show you an easy substitute using what I know as Celeriac, often called Celery Root. It is a kind of celery grown as a root vegetable that tastes like celery with a potato-like consistency. Common across the pond, we use as mash, in mash or even raw, grated in salads. Here’s how it stacks up against the potato:

Celery Root* Potato*
Calories 42 118
Carbohydrates 9g 27g
Dietary Fiber 2g 2g
*1 cup celery root (155g)
boiled, drained with no salt
*1 potato (136g)
boiled in skin with no salt

In California we can get celeriac all year round but the season runs about October through April. As for the tomatoes, I didn’t think it was tomato season yet we received these lovelies in our CSA box. Feel free to substitute any in-season veg for the tomatoes if you can’t get locally grown tomatoes this time of year.

RECIPE:
Serves 2

2 x 4-6 oz organic/grass fed chicken breasts

1 tbsp fresh marjoram
1 tbsp fresh oregano
1 large garlic clove – minced
3 tbsp olive oil
1/4 tsp black pepper
1/2 lemon – zested

2 medium celery roots (you’ll probably have some left overs but that’s grand!)
low-sodium chicken broth
S&P to taste

DIRECTIONS:

Begin by mixing all the marinade ingredients together in a mixing bowl. Add chicken breasts and coat. To store, either place in a Zilpoc bag or cover in a bowl in the fridge. Turn occasionally to make sure all sides are marinating.
NOTE: This can and should be done ahead of time to get maximum flavor. I would suggest marinating for at least 4 – 24 hours.

To cook celeriac:

Top and tail celery root and using a small kitchen knife carefully peel the outer layer. (Top & tail is common chef lingo, which means trim the top and bottom.)

Organic Celeriac aka Celery Root Prepping Celeriac

Once all peeled roughly chop root in equal size pieces and boil in salted water (maybe a couple of teaspoons) until fork tender. Drain and return to same pot. Mash, add broth, taste & season.

I made the little blistered cherry tomato thingy by sauteing some cherry tomatoes on medium heat in olive oil under they begin to break down. Once they soften add a drizzle of red wine vinegar and a pinch of S&P. These will add a nice contrast and burst of flavor with the chicken and celeriac.

Farmers' Market Cherry Tomatoes

Preheat grill pan or outdoor bbq and when hot sear chicken on both sides. Cook to internal temp. 160F, 8-12 minutes approx. Let rest for 3-4 minutes after cooking before cutting.

Grilled Marinated Organic Chicken

Tasty and easy! Let me know how you got on with the celeriac. Cheers!

All recipes are made with the finest quality farmers market whole foods, natural and non-processed ingredients as much as possible.

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Slow Cooked Chicken with Wild 'Rooms & Tarragon

Slow Cooked Chicken with Wild Rooms & Tarragon Slow Cooked Chicken with Wild Rooms & Tarragon

On a recent visit to Austin my brother-in-law gave me a packet of dried morels and asked me to create a dish for them. Though this is a dish I’ve made many many times I thought it would be the perfect recipe for the morels plus it’s fairly fool proof. (Let’s see if Ron will try his hand at cooking this!) Luckily, braising meats is dead easy, eliminates the risk of drying out meat and always adds great flavour. The key with slow cooking, as I’ve mentioned before, is layering flavours. Searing the chicken, sauteing the mushrooms, adding garlic, well you get it. The more flavours you add the more intense and tasty the end result will be. Stands to reason, right?

I recently made this for a drop-off menu (did you know I can make dinner for you and drop it off?) and they said their 2 year old loved the mushrooms (if you’re a parent, this got the tot’s seal of approval) and they said it was even better the next day. Gotta love delicious leftovers!

Continue reading the full recipe here and don’t forget to SUBSCRIBE to the HEALTHY IRISHMAN Newsletter!

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Fueling your body with healthy food. Fueling your mind with the wealth of health.

Copyright © 2009 The Healthy Irishman. All rights reserved

Winter Split Pea Soup

Split Pea Soup

Winter is arriving if not already here for a lot of you (apparently there’s snow in Houston?) so this is defo soup season. You all know there’s nothing better than a delicious bowl of homemade soup with a nice sangwich. I remember growing up in the tropical Isle of Ireland and the odd day it might be cold and wet my Mum would always make us soup for lunch. It’s always been one of those things that was a staple in our house as any leftover veg from dinner would be made into a delicious soup the next day. Those were the days.

This soup recipe is one of my faves and you’ll definitely love the fresh pea flavour and earthy texture. Off you pop and get the pot out.

Continue reading the full recipe here and don’t forget to SUBSCRIBE to the HEALTHY IRISHMAN Newsletter!

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Fueling your body with healthy food. Fueling your mind with the wealth of health.

Copyright © 2009 The Healthy Irishman. All rights reserved

Sesame Street v.s. Childhood Obesity

grover sesame street exercise

Sesame Street has joined the battle against childhood obesity.

First, it was Grover getting into the gym and pumping some iron.

Then, it was the Cookie Monster kicking his cookie addiction and switching to a diet heavy on fruits and vegetables.

Things were looking good in this battle between fit and fat.

Unfortunately, not everyone believed in the cause. There were traitors amongst us….

http://www.oliverwillis.com/files/flvplayer.swf?file=http://www.oliverwillis.com/files/colbert-cookiemonster.flv&autoStart=false

Cookie Monster Defends His Honor Vs. Colbert – Watch more Videos at Vodpod.

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But luckily, for every Stephen Colbert, there is a Michelle Obama, willing to stand up against video games and Twinkies and Big Gulps.

On this weeks 40th anniversary show, First Lady Michelle Obama helped a group of children plant a vegetable garden on Sesame Street.

And just like those vegetable seeds will eventually take root and grow into mature plants, let’s hope that the message of eating healthy and exercising daily will take root in the minds of a new generation of Sesame Street viewers.
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This is what happens when Health Habits doesn’t eat healthy

Yesterday was my wife’s birthday.

Instead of going out to a restaurant, I offered to cook one of her favorite meals:

  • Vegetable lasagna with 4 types of cheese
  • Garlic bread dripping with butter
  • Caesar salad
  • Ice cream for dessert
  • and a bottle of pinot grigio to wash it all down

veg lasagna

Mmmmmmm good…seriously. It tasted great. I make a really good lasagna.

However, this morning…

I feel like crap.

  • No energy
  • My sinuses are all stuffed up
  • Headache
  • Bloated – my wedding ring feels like it’s be soldered onto my finger
  • Heartburn
  • Stomach rumblin’ & grumblin”
  • I am craving carbs like crazy
  • And my face is all puffy…I have “bread head”

Bread Head…dammit!!!

In Defense of Farmers

photographer: Alia Malley
photographer: Alia Malley

In my hometown of Toronto, Michael Pollan is a hipster gOD.

His mantra to Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants. is spoken with reverence by those Torontonians with a social conscience and enough disposable income to live organic, green and sustainable.

And it isn’t only Toronto. From what I have heard, this new breed of Agri-Intellectuals can be found in every city in North America and beyond.

In fact, according to the most recent census data, Agri-Intellectuals are America’s fastest growing ethnic population.

And that’s great for Michael Pollan’s book sales.

But, not so great for conventional farmers.

And they’re starting to get a little pissed off.

omnivores delusion

This past July, farmer Blake Hurst penned this article.

In the article, Mr Hurst disputes a number of the anti-Big Ag arguments raised by Michael Pollan and other Agri-Intellectual deities.

He reminds us that “farming has always been messy and painful, and bloody and dirty. It still is. This is something the critics of industrial farming never seem to understand”.

He goes on to say that “farmers have reasons for their actions, and society should listen to them as we embark upon this reappraisal of our agricultural system.

“I use chemicals and diesel fuel to accomplish the tasks my grandfather used to do with sweat, and I use a computer instead of a lined notebook and a pencil, but I’m still farming the same land he did 80 years ago, and the fund of knowledge that our family has accumulated about our small part of Missouri is valuable”.

And everything I know and I have learned tells me this: we have to farm “industrially” to feed the world, and by using those “industrial” tools sensibly, we can accomplish that task and leave my grandchildren a prosperous and productive farm, while protecting the land, water, and air around us”.

Please note that this is only a small portion of the article. Please read the rest.

And when you do read the article, keep in mind that way back in 1995, farmer Hurst asked congress to end crop subsidies. At that time, Hurst was quoted as saying that “government farm programs have fleeced taxpayers and stifled farmers’ ingenuity and profits”.

This is not a man content to sit back and let the government nor the Agri-Intellectuals tell him how to do his job.

And he’s not alone.

Last Thursday, Michael Pollan was invited to speak about his book, In Defense of Food to an audience of 8000 at the U of Wisconsin.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

more about “Michael Pollan at the U of Wisconsin“, posted with vodpod

Amongst that 8000 were 200 In Defense of Farming protesters.

Luckily, it was all very…civilized.

Dammit.

(media hates civilized protests)

On Friday, the protest continued when the U of W held a panel discussion involving Pollan, a U of W student and two farmers.

I can’t find any video of the event, but according to this review of the panel discussion, the U of W student took the position of Big Ag and went right at Pollan.

She covered the typical Big Ag talking points:

  • America has the safest, most abundant food supply in the world.
  • Global food production needs to double by 2050 if we are going to feed everyone.
  • She said that 99% of Wisconsin’s farmers are family farmers.
  • And she called Pollan “polarizing”

Pollan responded by:

  • commending one of the farmers on his innovations and said that he would love to come and visit his farm.
  • saying that he doesn’t think the world should have only one type of farming. He used the phrase “Let a hundred flowers bloom,” meaning: the more diversity in farming, the better. Let’s try everything and only through that will we see what works best.
  • Pollan went on to say that critique is not necessarily a bad thing, and it’s not necessarily an attack. He said that he’s critiquing the system, not the farmers, and he made the analogy that in our national critique of the health care system, we aren’t criticizing the doctors.
  • He said that in fact, much of his critique is directed at the people who buy the food from the farmers and process it before selling it to the consumer.
  • He also said that the interests of agribusiness is often at odds with the interest of farmers. In fact, agribusiness exploits farmers and squeezes them off the land.

Conclusion

North American food production is becoming an even more important topic as we attempt to climb out of the global recession and hope to reverse current trends in obesity and healthcare.

Now if only the policymakers can act half as civilized as Michael Pollan & the folks from In Defense of Farmers.

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Curried Split Pea Soup

Curried Split Pea Soup

Peas are one of my favorite vegetables. Probably because I grew up on mushy peas (an Irish delicacy). When in season fresh peas are a delight but in winter months dried split peas come in handy. They’re not only convenient since they don’t require soaking, but they’re also high in nutrients and low in fat and calories.
If you are concerned about coconut milk, turns out it’s gotten a bad rap over the years. The saturated fat content in coconut milk has been shown in independent studies to be an easily metabolized good saturated fat, which means it does not transform into bad cholesterol, clogging up arteries. Using light coconut milk cuts the calories and fat by more than half, paving the way to a delicious healthy meal.

Picture 7Picture 8

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Fueling your body with healthy food. Fueling your mind with the wealth of health.

Copyright © 2009 The Healthy Irishman. All rights reserved.

Get Fit and Save Money

frugal food and fitness

The “experts” say that low income families have higher levels of obesity because “healthy” food is too expensive.

I say….B.S.

You can eat healthy on a small budget.

  • This free ebook from Kerry Taylor shows you how to eat healthy and save money.
  • This post from Mark’s Daily Apple shows you how to eat a paleo-style diet on the cheap.
  • The Eat Well guide helps you find healthy and affordable foods in your neighborhood (Thanks to the Healthy Irishman for putting me onto this resource)
  • Fitness magazine has a ton of money-saving, healthy dinner recipes – Buddha Stir-Fry $3.04

stir fry recipe

  • McDonalds does not – Big Mac combo $5.29

big mac combo

  • Kathy’s Healthy Food on a Budget blog is another fine resource
  • Jimmy Moore shows you how to eat low carb on a budget (sorry about the singing)

And what about the government’s involvement in the cost of healthy food?

government food subsidies

Billions of your tax dollars being spent on farm subsidies, and with less than 1% goes to America’s fruit & vegetable farmers…is it any wonder that a salad costs more than a Big Mac?

But, there is hope.

image: Ozier Muhammad/The New York Times
image: Ozier Muhammad/The New York Times

New York City is planning to “offer zoning and tax incentives to spur the development of full-service grocery stores that devote a certain amount of space to fresh produce, meats, dairy and other perishables”.

The plan — which has broad support among food policy experts, supermarket executives and City Council members, whose approval is needed — would permit developers to construct larger buildings than existing zoning would ordinarily allow, and give tax abatements and exemptions for approved stores in large swaths of northern Manhattan, central Brooklyn and the South Bronx, as well as downtown Jamaica in Queens….read more

So, there you go…no more excuses.

  • You can eat healthy while on a budget.
  • And if you want to save even more money, tell the senior levels of government how you would like to see your tax dollars spent (or not spent) on farm subsidies.
  • And then tell your municipal governments to create bylaws like NYC.

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test-tube-meat health nutrition food healthhabits

Test tube meat

PETA is offering a $1 million prize to the scientist who can MacGyver commercially viable meat in a laboratory.

This has to be a joke, right?

As reported in this article, “the reward would go to the first scientist to produce enough test-tube chicken to be sold in 10 U.S. states by June 30, 2012, at a price competitive with prevailing chicken prices.”

Meat grown in a test tube. We are not talking about the mystery meat being produced today, but real, honest to God science fiction food.

To me, the fact that it is PETA offering their version of the Xprize is irrelevant. PETA is just attempting to dovetail the ongoing research into this engineered food-type product with their campaign to save animal life (deprive humans of a juicy steak). PETA president, Ingrid Newkirk was quoted as saying that “humans don’t need to eat meat at all,” and that since many people “refuse to kick their meat addictions, PETA is willing to help them gain access to flesh that doesn’t cause suffering and death.”

What is relevant is the shift from real food from real farmers for real people to meat from a laboratory.

And it’s going to happen. People will be buying this stuff.

  • For decades, we have been buying processed foods pumped with chemicals.
  • Now it’s normal to purchase food made from genetically modified seeds.
  • Some of us are eating food, like Quorn, which is processed in a lab, made from the filamentous fungus Fusarium venenatum strain PTA-2684.
  • As if that wasn’t bad enough, we eat foods designed to survive a nuclear winter (see Twinkie).

In today’s world of processed “food”, test tube meat may, in fact, be the ultimate foodstuff.

By purchasing “bio-meat”:

  • You are saving the environment,
  • You are preventing human starvation,
  • You are saving the animals,
  • You will probably be saving yourself from heart disease.

Maybe this stuff isn’t so bad. Then again, it still sounds pretty gross to me.