In honor of my trip home to Ireland recently here’s a lovely quick n easy lamb dish. In case that doesn’t make sense lamb’s very popular in Ireland. A little known fact you can tell your friends, the word Paleo is a Gaelic word meaning  ‘always trust an Irishman’s lamb recipe’. Who knew?
The seasoning here is basically flavoured S&P which adds a little extra to the already flavourful meat.

Not much else to say.

Enjoy!

RECIPE:

Serves 4

1 lb grass fed Lamb noisette
1 tbsp lemon pepper
2 tsp garlic salt

Here’s the full recipe. Take a gander ’round my site and you’ll find lots more healthy tidbits.

You’ll also find a bunch more Paleo friendly recipes to keep you busy.

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Cheers guys.

3 comments

  1. Grains are a fantastic source of calories – very important when you’re trying not to starve. But, when it comes to the health of the consumer, grains are inferior to fruit & veg as a source of carbohydrates.

    And when we look at the history of homo sapiens nutrition, 30,000 years is just like yesterday to our DNA. We think that it’s normal to eat grains and that it’s abnormal not to.

    Wrong

    Grains are a recent experiment. Just like refined sugar, MSG & trans fats.

  2. I have to fundamentally disagree that 30,000 years is “like yesterday to our DNA”. In fact, research indicates that human evolution may have even sped up since the advent of agriculture (~10,000 years ago).

    30,000 years is more than 1,300 generations at an average generation time of 22 years (wiki). To think that no selection evolution can occur over 1300 generations is to not understand evolution and the natural selection process. In fact, microevolutionary change (below the species level) can occur over just a FEW generations (http://www.nature.com/scitable/knowledge/library/evolution-is-change-in-the-inherited-traits-15164254).

    Certainly grains cannot be considered as recent an experiment as industrial sugar refining and the isolation of MSG from seaweed.

    Just some food for thought.

    Lowsauss, (M.Sc. Biology, if it matters)

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